_WHTC_WYVN Hope College Anchored in Hope - Blog

  • Student Dance Concerts Featured Nov. 19-20 and Dec. 3-4

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College is presenting its annual fall student dance concerts on Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 19 and 20, at the Dow Center dance studio, and on Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 3 and 4, at 8 p.m. at the Knickerbocker Theatre in downtown Holland.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    All of the works being presented have been created and danced by Hope College students, who also design and create their own costumes and sound/music scores. The students are mentored by the concert co-producers, dance faculty members Steven Iannacone and Matthew Farmer, and are assisted with lighting and technical design by staff member Erik Alberg, who is the college's technical director for the performing arts, and the students of the Production I class.

    The students who submit work to be adjudicated by the judging panel range from dance majors and minors, to students in dance composition classes, to students who have danced through their entire high school career but are pursuing a different major. As a result, the concerts highlight what students are learning and experimenting with at Hope in the field of dance and showcase a variety of dance forms.

    The program for each of the concert venues will be different, with the pieces matched to the setting that best suits them. Works selected for the Dow “white box” space will have the benefit of a more open, intimate and personal environment with a white floor and backdrop, while the pieces for the Knickerbocker will have the benefit of a traditional “black box” theater with additional technical capacities.

    The Dow Center dance studio is on the second floor of the Dow Center, located at 168 E. 13th St., on the corner of 13th Street and Columbia Avenue.  The Knickerbocker Theater is located at 86 E. Eighth St.

  • Joanne Stewart Part of NSF-Funded Project to Develop Teaching Materials

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Dr. Joanne Stewart of the Hope College faculty is part of the leadership team of a national online resource featuring teaching materials for inorganic chemistry that has recently received a major grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) that will help expand its content.

    The project, titled “IONiC: Transforming Education Through Collaborative Development of Materials at the Frontiers of Inorganic Chemistry,” has received a four-year, $437,962 award from the NSF to develop additional classroom and laboratory lessons based on the latest research in inorganic chemistry by top scientists from around the country.  The materials will then be made available at no charge to instructors of inorganic chemistry on IONiC’s web site, “VIPEr” (for “Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Electronic Resource”).

    The NSF support will enable IONiC to organize a series of four summer workshops during which faculty from within the IONiC community will work with the authors of the new research to develop at least 80 new high-quality teaching resources that relate the research to fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry.  The workshops will run from 2013 through 2016.

    IONiC is short for “Intellectual Online Network of Inorganic Chemists.”  The NSF-funded content expansion reflects the network’s on-going mission to enhance undergraduate chemistry teaching through a community of educators dedicated to sharing and improving lessons and ideas to both inform and excite students about the discipline.

    “The site emphasizes active learning and provides great ideas for bringing active learning into the chemistry classroom,” said Stewart, a professor of chemistry at Hope who joined the Leadership Council for IONiC in 2007.  “What this grant does that’s unique is that it brings cutting-edge research in science into what is essentially an introductory course in inorganic chemistry, and that’s not easy to do.”

    Launched by a team of seven chemists, IONiC now has more than 500 registered users. Through VIPEr, the project currently makes available more than 440 lessons in a variety of subfields within the discipline of inorganic chemistry, a resource that Stewart noted that she finds useful continuously.

    “When I teach inorganic, for almost every class day I have chosen a VIPEr activity to do in class,” Stewart said.  “Because many of the activities are also appropriate for general chemistry, several of us use them in teaching our general chemistry students as well.”

    The site also includes interactive forums that enable participants to write about their experiences using the lessons, discuss teaching, share information about additional resources or consider other topics related to their profession.

    “It’s not just small colleges.  There are also two-year colleges and large universities on the site,” Stewart said.  “There are very few places that bring all these faculty together.”

    The new grant, which is being administered through Earlham College, is the second that IONiC has received from the NSF.  A two-year, $150,000 award in 2007 assisted in the site’s development across 2008 and 2009.

    In addition to Earlham and Hope, the institutions represented on IONiC’s Leadership Council include the Claremont Colleges, the College of Wooster, DePauw University, Harvey Mudd College, James Madison University, Lafayette College, Reed College, Smith College and the University of Michigan at Dearborn.  More information about IONiC is available at www.ionicviper.org.

  • James Bultman to Receive Dutch-American Leadership Award

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College President Dr. James E. Bultman will receive a “West Michigan Dutch-American Leadership Award” during the West Michigan Dutch-American Heritage Day celebration on Thursday, Nov. 15.

    Bultman, who is retiring at the end of the school year after serving as Hope’s president for 14 years, will receive the honor during the Dutch Heritage Celebration Dinner being held at The Pinnacle Center in Hudsonville.  The award is also being presented to Dr. Gaylen J. Byker, who recently retired as president of Calvin College in Grand Rapids.

    Bultman became the 11th president of Hope College on July 1, 1999.  A 1963 Hope graduate, he assumed office having already had more than two decades of direct experience with the college, including his student days.

    He and his wife, Martie, a Hope classmate, have been active members of the campus community.  Particularly committed to students, they have regularly attended events ranging from academic colloquia, to performances, to Chapel services, to athletic contests, to activities such as Dance Marathon.  Martie’s involvement in the life of the college included serving for many years as co-advisor of the college’s Alcor chapter of Mortar Board.

    Bultman’s emphasis as president has been on assuring that Hope provides students with an exceptional educational experience in a vibrant and caring Christian environment. His leadership has included leading the college in updating its mission statement and identifying the distinctive qualities of a Hope education.

    Hope has enjoyed distinction on a variety of external measures during his tenure, including consistently holding more grants through the National Science Foundation’s summer “Research Experiences for Undergraduates” program than any other liberal arts college in the country, and national accreditation in all four arts programs (art, dance, music, and theatre). A Lilly-funded “Program for the Theological Exploration of Vocation” established in the fall of 2003 expanded the college’s emphasis on encouraging students to consider the role of calling in their life and career choices. In 2011, Hope was one of only 115 colleges and universities across the country named to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s “2010 Community Engagement Classification,” a reflection of the college’s institution-wide emphasis on service and service-learning.

    The past 14 years have also been a period of steady growth in enrollment, from 2,943 students in 1999 to more than 3,200 students each year since 2006, including a record enrollment of 3,343 during the current school year.

    During his tenure, Hope has pursued the two largest single fund-raising efforts in the college’s history.  The college launched the “Legacies: A Vision of Hope” comprehensive campaign during his second year as president.  The campaign’s four major components included construction of the A. Paul Schaap Science Center and renovation of the Peale Science Center; construction of the DeVos Fieldhouse; increasing the endowment; and general campus improvements, including the construction of the Martha Miller Center for communication, modern and classical languages, international education, and multicultural life, a restoration of historic Graves Hall and a renovation of Lubbers Hall.  When it concluded in 2005, Hope had raised more than $161 million from more than 3,300 donors, well above the goal of $105 million.

    Hope launched its current “A Greater Hope” comprehensive campaign in October 2011.  The $175 million effort will benefit every student as it strengthens the college’s endowment, adds several new buildings, and supports immediate needs through the annual Hope Fund.  The endowment portion of the campaign includes $30 million for student scholarships, $20 million for faculty-student collaborative research, $20 million to support outstanding faculty in their teaching and research, and $10 million for initiatives in international and multicultural education and spiritual life. Major enhancements to the campus will include a concert hall and music building, a new student center, an art museum and an engineering addition, in addition to the already completed outdoor VandePoel-Heeringa Stadium Courts at the Etheridge Tennis Complex, Van Andel Soccer Stadium, Boeve Baseball Stadium and Wolters Softball Stadium.

    In addition to the campaign initiatives, Hope is currently constructing a new housing complex, the Tom and Ryan Cook Village.

    Bultman joined the Hope education faculty in 1968, chaired the department of education from 1976 to 1982, and was dean of the social sciences from 1982 until 1985.  He was head baseball coach at Hope from 1971 to 1985, and an assistant football coach from 1970 to 1984.

    He took office at Hope having had extensive experience as a college president.  From 1985 to 1999, he was president of Northwestern College in Orange City, Iowa.  Northwestern, like Hope, is one of three colleges with ties to the Reformed Church in America.

    An active leader in higher education circles, Bultman serves on Presidents Council of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the Board of Control of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) and the Presidents Council of the Michigan Colleges Foundation (MCF).

    He is a member of the Holland Area Chamber of Commerce and the Holland Rotary Club, and serves on the Board of Directors at The Bank of Holland, the Board of Directors of the Economic Club of Grand Rapids, and the Board of Governors of the Van Andel Institute.

    Bultman has served an elected term on the Executive Committee of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) where he chaired the Student Financial Aid Committee; served as chair of AICUM; and served as chair of the Board of Directors of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. Additionally, he was a member of the Council of Presidents of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA); and was chair of the Iowa College Foundation, the Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, and the Commission on Campus Concerns for NAICU.

    He graduated from Hope with a major in chemistry.  He holds a master’s degree and doctorate in educational leadership from Western Michigan University.

    Before joining Hope’s faculty, Bultman taught and coached in the public schools in Portage and was the assistant principal of Portage Northern High School.

    Hope presented him with a Distinguished Alumni Award in May, 1995.  He received an honorary degree (L.H.D.) from Keiwa College, a sister college of Northwestern in Shibata City, Japan in March, 1998 and the honorary degree (Litt.D.) from Hope College on the occasion of his inauguration on October 22, 1999.  In October, 2001, Bultman was presented a Distinguished Alumni Award from the Western Michigan University Alumni Association.

    The Hope College Board of Trustees at their October 2011 meeting announced the naming of the future student center in honor of the Bultmans, and the Bultmans received the Hope for Humanity Award from the college’s Alumni H-Club at the 2011 Homecoming.

    The Bultmans have two grown children: a son, Matthew, in Overland Park, Kan., and a daughter, Heather, in Broadhead, Wis.; and five grandchildren.

    Dutch-American Heritage Day began in 1991 through a proclamation by President George H.W. Bush. The date marks the first recognition of the flag of the United States by a foreign power, when the Dutch governor of the island of St. Eustatius in the West Indies ordered his fort’s cannons fired in a friendly salute of the American warship “Andrew Doria” on Nov. 16, 1776, only four months after the U.S. had declared its independence from Great Britain. Dutch connections to the Americas began more than a century and a half earlier, in 1609, when Captain Henry Hudson of the Dutch East India Company sailed up the present-day Hudson River seeking a shorter route to Asia, with Dutch settlement of the region following just a few years later. Today, some eight million Americans are of Dutch descent, including a sizeable percentage of West Michigan residents whose ancestors immigrated to the area during and since the mid-19th century.

    More information about the Dutch Heritage Celebration Dinner is available online at wmdutch-americanheritage.com

  • Jazz Ensembles to Present Lunchtime Concert on Nov. 20

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Hope College Mainstream Ensemble and Jazz Arts Collective will present a lunchtime concert on Tuesday, Nov. 20, at noon in the Kletz on the ground level of the DeWitt Center.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The Mainstream Ensemble, which is one of the jazz chamber ensembles at Hope, will perform “Strange Vibe” and “Peace,” both by Horace Silver.  The ensemble is coached by Robert Hodson, professor of music and chairperson of the department.  The students in the group include: junior Matt Costello of Holland, bass; junior Michael Graverson of Hamilton, guitar; junior Daniel Langholz of Ramstein, Germany, trombone; sophomore Matthew Milliken of Roscommon, alto saxophone; sophomore Andrew Valesano of Sherwood, Ore., piano; and senior David Webster of Troy, drums.

    The Jazz Arts Collective will perform “Accra,” by Geoff Keezer; “Rue Prevail,” by Art Farmer; “Jodi,” by Walter Davis Jr.; “Byrdflight,” by Brian Lynch; “Al’s Mist,” by Al Grey; “Dealer Takes Four,” by Rogers Grant; “Children,” by Jack Walrath; and “Voodoo Child,” by Jimi Hendrix.  The group is is directed by Brian Coyle, who is a professor of music and director of the jazz studies area at Hope. 

    The students involved in the ensemble are: sophomore Scott Cathey of Ada, trumpet; junior Jared DeMeester of Grand Rapids, bass; junior Forrest Dodson of Kalamazoo, samples, turntable and bass clarinet; freshman Palmer D’Orazio of Clarkston, alto saxophone; junior Michael Graverson of Hamilton, guitar; sophomore Jake Kalmink of Zeeland, baritone; junior Daniel Langholz of Ramstein, Germany, trombone; sophomore Matthew Milliken of Roscommon, tenor saxophone; senior Michael Reynolds of Tampa, Fla., piano; freshman Matt Tallman of York, Pa., percussion; and senior David Webster of Troy, drums.

    The Jazz Chamber Ensembles afford students the opportunity to perform in the classic small group combo setting.  The ensembles vary in size and instrumentation and place a creative focus on improvisation and group communication.  All of the ensembles perform works from the classic jazz repertoire.   The more advanced jazz chamber ensembles also perform repertoire from the contemporary jazz world.  These ensembles also place an emphasis on original student and faculty compositions.  All ensembles are coached by members of the Hope College jazz faculty.  The Jazz Chamber Ensembles are open to anyone interested, regardless of experience with jazz.

    Jazz Arts Collective is the premier large jazz ensemble at Hope College.  The Collective places a creative focus on ensemble communication and improvisation.  Comprised of a rhythm section and flexible wind/string instrumentation, this select group performs compositions and arrangements from across the full spectrum of music.  The collective’s repertoire ranges from the great historical jazz composers such as Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus, to works by modern jazz masters like Vince Mendoza, Jim McNeely and John Hollenbeck. The Jazz Arts Collective frequently performs commissions, works by emerging young composers, and originals by Hope College faculty and students. The ensemble also collectively reinterprets and re-imagines the music from the twentieth century classical repertoire.

    The DeWitt Center is located at 141 E. 12th St., on Columbia Avenue at 12th Street.

  • Women’s Chamber Choir to Perform on Nov. 19

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Women’s Chamber Choir of Hope College will perform its fall concert with 12th Street Harmony and Luminescence on Monday, Nov. 19, at 7:30 p.m. at St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The group will be performing “Psalm Settings,” by Ruth Watson Henderson, with Sarah Southard, instructor of oboe at Hope; “Ascribe to the Lord,” by Rosephanye Powell; “Faith is the bird,” text by Rabindranath Tagore and music by Elizabeth Alexander; “Ave Maria,” by Poulenc; and “Blessings,” by Katie Moran Bart.

    Also during the concert, the group will sing a set of lullabies from around the world. The pieces are meant to say something about life’s ups and downs:  a sick mother working hard for little pay, a realization that not every baby is fortunate enough to have a mother to rock him or her, and an intuition that mothers feel.

    The concert will feature number of soloists from within the choir, as well as a guest vocalist, sophomore Katrina Baker of Hudsonville.

    Hope staff member Lannette Zylman-Tenhave will be performing the piano accompaniment.

    The choir will be joined by Hope's close-harmony groups, Luminescence (women) and 12th Street Harmony (men).

    The Women’s Chamber Choir, established in 2001, is an auditioned group of 20-25 Hope students, directed by Jennifer Wolfe, adjunct assistant professor of music.

    St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church is located at 195 W. 13th St., on the corner of 13th Street and Maple Avenue.

  • Panel Discussion Will Examine Recent Election

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College will host a post-election panel discussion featuring members of the political science and history faculty on Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 6 p.m. in the Maas Center conference room.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The panel will discuss the election, answer questions from the audience and comment on questions that were collected from students on campus.

    The panelists will be Dr. Jack Holmes, professor of political science; Dr. Jeanne Petit, associate professor of history; Dr. David Ryden, professor of political science; and Dr. Joel Toppen, associate professor of political science.  The event is being sponsored by the college’s department of political science and chapter of the national Pi Sigma Alpha political science honorary society.

     The Maas Center is located at 264 Columbia Ave., on Columbia Avenue at 11th Street.

  • Sports Medicine Lecture to Focus on Barefoot and Minimalist Running

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Distinguished Lecture Series in Sports Medicine at Hope College will feature the address “Recognition and Management of Lower Leg Pathologies in Athletics” by Dr. Bruce Stewart of Shoreline Orthopaedics on Monday, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The lecture will focus on the recognition, prevention and treatment of common acute and chronic disorders of the lower leg, including traumatic fractures, stress fractures, acute as well as exertional compartment syndrome, Achilles tendon injuries and tendonopathies of the leg.

    Stewart is an orthopaedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine, and has extensive experience dealing with high school, college and professional athletes.  Since joining Shoreline Orthopaedics in 2009, he has become heavily involved in treating athletes at Hope as well as at the area high schools, and he has a close working relationship with the area’s athletic trainers. He previously spoke through the lecture series in December 2009.

    Before to coming to Holland, he completed a sports medicine fellowship at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas.  His activities in Houston included providing team and game coverage for the Houston Astros Major League Baseball team, Houston Texans NFL team and Houston Dynamo Major League Soccer team, as well as University of Houston athletic teams and several Houston-area high school football teams.

    Prior to specializing in sports medicine in fellowship, he was in residency and an intern at Northwestern University in Chicago, Ill.  While in residency, he trained with the team doctors for the Chicago Bears, the Chicago Cubs, the Chicago Fire and Northwestern University athletic teams; was involved in numerous sports medicine activities, including coverage of the Big Ten Men’s Basketball Tournament, the NBA pre-draft camp and the Joffrey Ballet; and performed athletic physicals and football game physician coverage for the Chicago Public Schools.

    Stewart is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.  He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan and his M.D. at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, and also holds an MBA from Georgetown University.

    The Distinguished Lecture Series in Sports Medicine is designed for health care professionals with an interest in physically active patients, and is intended for students, educators and clinicians alike. It is co-sponsored by Shoreline Orthopaedics, Holland Hospital Rehabilitation Services, The Bone and Joint Center, and the college.

    The series will continue during the spring semester with the presentations “Preventing Sudden Death in Athletes” on Monday, Jan. 28, by Dr. Douglas Casa of the University of Connecticut, and “Truths/Myths of Concussion Management” on Monday, Feb. 25, by Dr. Jeffrey Kutcher of University of Michigan Neurology.

    Graves Hall is located at 263 College Ave., on College Avenue between 10th and 12th streets.

  • Sports Medicine Lecture to Focus on Lower Leg Pathologies

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Distinguished Lecture Series in Sports Medicine at Hope College will feature the address “Recognition and Management of Lower Leg Pathologies in Athletics” by Dr. Bruce Stewart of Shoreline Orthopaedics on Monday, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The lecture will focus on the recognition, prevention and treatment of common acute and chronic disorders of the lower leg, including traumatic fractures, stress fractures, acute as well as exertional compartment syndrome, Achilles tendon injuries and tendonopathies of the leg.

    Stewart is an orthopaedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine, and has extensive experience dealing with high school, college and professional athletes.  Since joining Shoreline Orthopaedics in 2009, he has become heavily involved in treating athletes at Hope as well as at the area high schools, and he has a close working relationship with the area’s athletic trainers. He previously spoke through the lecture series in December 2009.

    Before to coming to Holland, he completed a sports medicine fellowship at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas.  His activities in Houston included providing team and game coverage for the Houston Astros Major League Baseball team, Houston Texans NFL team and Houston Dynamo Major League Soccer team, as well as University of Houston athletic teams and several Houston-area high school football teams.

    Prior to specializing in sports medicine in fellowship, he was in residency and an intern at Northwestern University in Chicago, Ill.  While in residency, he trained with the team doctors for the Chicago Bears, the Chicago Cubs, the Chicago Fire and Northwestern University athletic teams; was involved in numerous sports medicine activities, including coverage of the Big Ten Men’s Basketball Tournament, the NBA pre-draft camp and the Joffrey Ballet; and performed athletic physicals and football game physician coverage for the Chicago Public Schools.

    Stewart is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.  He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan and his M.D. at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, and also holds an MBA from Georgetown University.

    The Distinguished Lecture Series in Sports Medicine is designed for health care professionals with an interest in physically active patients, and is intended for students, educators and clinicians alike. It is co-sponsored by Shoreline Orthopaedics, Holland Hospital Rehabilitation Services, The Bone and Joint Center, and the college.

    The series will continue during the spring semester with the presentations “Preventing Sudden Death in Athletes” on Monday, Jan. 28, by Dr. Douglas Casa of the University of Connecticut, and “Truths/Myths of Concussion Management” on Monday, Feb. 25, by Dr. Jeffrey Kutcher of University of Michigan Neurology.

    Graves Hall is located at 263 College Ave., on College Avenue between 10th and 12th streets.

     
  • Hope Music Students to Present “Liederabend” Concert Nov. 20

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College music students will present a “Liederabend” (song evening) on Tuesday, Nov. 20, at 7 p.m. in Semelink Lecture Hall of Western Theological Seminary.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The concert will feature singers enrolled in the college’s German Diction class.  Students in the class learn to transliterate German texts into the International Phonetic Alphabet, learn to pronounce German texts, and study the development of the German Lied. A special feature of this year’s class is a series of four Skype master classes with a German tenor in Munich. Each singer performs via Skype for Herr Schuricke in Munich, Germany, during the class, receiving pronunciation and interpretive feedback from a performer with whom Linda Dykstra, who is the course’s instructor and an associate professor of music, sang when she lived in Germany.

    Dykstra began the Liederabend tradition in 1998 with the institution of the Diction for Singers sequence of classes. It was established to provide a historical performance context for the intimate Lied, as well as an opportunity for the students to perform the repertoire they learn in the class. In keeping with the authenticity of the event, coffee and German tortes are served at a reception following the performance.

    Western Theological Seminary is located at 101 E. 13th St., on 13th Street east of College Avenue.

  • Film “Miss Representation” to Be Shown on Nov. 12

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The award-winning documentary film “Miss Representation” will be shown at Hope College with a panel discussion afterward on Monday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. at the Knickerbocker Theatre in downtown Holland.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    The film explores how the media’s misrepresentation of women, with an emphasis on youth and appearance, has led to the underrepresentation of women in positions of power and influence in America.  It includes stories from teenage girls and interviews with politicians, journalists, entertainers, educators and academics, like Condoleeza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Rachel Maddow, Margaret Cho, Rosario Dawson and Gloria Steinem.

    Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, “Miss Representation” premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and aired on “OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network.”  It won “Outstanding Documentary” recognition in the 2012 Gracie Allen Awards.

    The presentation is sponsored by the college’s department of education and women’s studies program.  The panel discussion, which will immediately follow the film, will include three members of the Hope community: Becky Schmidt, assistant professor of kinesiology and coach of the women’s volleyball team; John Yelding, associate professor of education; and sophomore Emilly Hickmott, a communication major and women’s studies minor from Decatur.

    The Knickerbocker Theatre is located at 86 E. Eighth St.

  • Allan Boesak and Curtiss DeYoung to Discuss “Radical Reconciliation

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Rev. Dr. Allan Boesak and Rev. Dr. Curtiss DeYoung will present the address “Radical Reconciliation: Beyond Political Pietism and Church Quietism” on Friday, Nov. 9, at 3:30 p.m. at Hope College in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    Boesak is recognized for his leadership role in the anti-apartheid freedom struggle in South Africa, and DeYoung is a professor of reconciliation studies at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minn.  They are co-authors of the book “Radical Reconciliation: Beyond Political Pietism and Church Quietism,” published earlier this year by Orbis Books.

    Boesak will also be speaking during the college’s chapel service on Friday, Nov. 9, at 10:30 a.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.  Admission to the service is free and the public is invited, but seating is typically limited.

    Boesak previously spoke at Hope on Feb. 28, 1990, delivering the opening keynote address “South Africa Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow: Facing the Challenges of Our Times” for the annual Critical Issues Symposium, during which he received an honorary degree (doctorate of divinity) from the college. The symposium that year explored “The Quest for Justice: Christian Voices.”

    During the anti-apartheid freedom struggle in South Africa, Boesak and Archbishop Desmond Tutu led the United Democratic Front (UDF)–the equivalent to the civil rights movement in the United States. Bringing together more than 700 organizations from all communities, the UDF became the first genuinely non-racial movement and the main force behind the anti-apartheid activities in the country during the decisive decade of the 1980s.

    Boesak is a pastor in the Uniting Reformed Church and has served the church in many local, national, and international posts including the South African Council of Churches. At 36 years of age he was elected the president of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches; the youngest ever, and the first African and person from the developing world to hold that position.

    Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called Boesak the most powerful orator ever produced by South Africa. Boesak is the author or editor of nearly 20 books.

                            DeYoung, who is an ordained minister in the Church of God, headquartered in Anderson, Ind., has spent his life working both nationally and internationally to develop networks for reconciliation, peace, justice and human rights.  He has traveled to South Africa on nine occasions speaking on reconciliation and the multiculturalism of the Bible.

    Prior to his current position at Bethel University, he served for 17 years in urban multicultural settings in Minneapolis–St. Paul, Minn., as the president of the Twin Cities Urban Reconciliation Network (TURN), the executive director of the City Gate Project, and the senior pastor at a multiracial congregation.  He also served congregations in Washington, D.C, and New York City, and worked at the Covenant House Times Square shelter for homeless and runaway youth in New York City.

    DeYoung is an author, co-author or editor of more than a dozen books on the topic of reconciliation and social justice, including, in addition to “Radical Reconciliation,” “United by Faith: The Multiracial Congregation as an Answer to the Problem of Race” and “Reconciliation: Our Greatest Challenge --Our Only Hope.”  He has led retreats for Hope students, faculty and staff on the theme of reconciliation, and also spoke during a Hope chapel service in March.

                            The Friday-afternoon presentation is among multiple events scheduled across the school year for additional discussion of themes explored in this year’s Critical Issues Symposium, which was held on Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 25-26, and examined “Reconciliation: Hope in a Divided World.”  The symposium featured a variety of keynote addresses, focus sessions and department-sponsored sessions.

                            Dimnent Memorial Chapel is located at 277 College Ave., on College Avenue at 12th Street. Graves Hall is located at 263 College Ave., between 10th and 12th streets.

  • Student Research Honored at National Chemical Engineering Conference

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – A total of eight Hope College students who participated in research this past summer had their work selected for presentation during the recent Annual Meeting and National Student Conference of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), with three of them receiving awards.

    The only institutions having more award winners than Hope were three large state universities.  At least one student who participated in Hope's summer research program has received an award in this national competition in each of the last five years.

    The eight presentations by Hope students were double the total number of undergraduate research presentations from all other colleges and universities in Michigan combined.  In the past four years, a total of 26 Hope students have participated in the undergraduate research session of the national conference, a number exceeded by only five other colleges or universities nationally.

    Senior Howard Dobbs of Warrenville, Ill., won second place in the “Fuels, Petrochemicals, and Energy III” category.  It was the third consecutive year that Dobbs received an award for his undergraduate research presentation at this conference.  Hope’s other award winners were senior Katherine Brune of Midland, who received third place in the “Materials Engineering and Sciences IV” category, and junior Alexander Perkins of Brighton, who received third place in the “Computing, Simulation, and Process Control” category.

    The National Student Conference ran Friday-Monday, Oct. 26-29 and the Annual Meeting ran Sunday-Friday, Oct. 28-Nov. 2, in Pittsburgh, Pa.  The undergraduate poster session took place on Monday, Oct. 29, and featured work grouped within a variety of categories within the field of chemical engineering.

    The preliminary program for the student poster session listed 224 posters.  The primary presenters represented institutions in 33 states, Puerto Rico, and five other countries.  Of the 75 colleges, universities and laboratories listed as affiliation of the primary presenter, only five institutions had more posters listed in the event than Hope College.

    Nearly all of the participating Hope students are engineering majors, or plan to declare an engineering major, with most of them in the chemical, biochemical or environmental engineering emphasis options.  One is a chemistry major who plans to declare an engineering minor, and one is currently participating in a full-time engineering internship through December and will return to Hope next semester.  Three Hope faculty in chemistry, two in engineering, and one in mathematics were mentors for one or more of the projects.  One student completed his project externally as a participant in the 2012 Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships program of the U.S. Department of Energy and was mentored by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne.

    In addition to Brune, Dobbs and Perkins, the Hope students attending the conference to present their posters were:  senior Kwang jin Kim of Seoul, South Korea; senior Jenelle Ranville of Grand Rapids; sophomore Evelyn Ritter of Libertyville, Ill.; and senior Samantha Steffens of Grand Rapids. Sophomore Minchul Kim of Seoul, South Korea, was unable to attend, but his poster was displayed at the conference.

    Dobbs won his second-place award for the presentation “Durability Analysis of Li-O2 Batteries Through in-Situ μ-XRD Characterization,” which he co-authored with Dr. Jianglan Shui and Dr. Di-jia Liu, researchers in Chemical Sciences and Engineering at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Brune won her third-place award for “The Directed Alignment of Functionalized Nanowires Relative to Chemical Patterns,” which she co-authored with sophomore Cameron Holder of Naples, Fla., and Dr. Mary E. Anderson, assistant professor of chemistry.

    Perkins won his third-place award for “Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Wind Over Sand Dunes,” which he co-authored with Dr. Brian Yurk, assistant professor of mathematics.

    Kwang jin Kim’s presentation, “A Cyclic Voltammetric Study of Three-Dimensionally Ordered Macroporous Carbon-Based Electrodes,” was co-authored with Dr. Kenneth L. Brown, associate professor of chemistry.  It appeared in the “Materials Engineering and Sciences II” category.

    Minchul Kim’s poster, “An Improved Simple Method for Vapor Pressure Prediction From Cubic Equations of State,” was co-authored with Dr. Michael J. Misovich, associate professor of engineering. It appeared in a combined category of “General Engineering and Engineering Education.”

    Ranville’s presentation, “Factors Affecting the Kinetics of Biodiesel Reactions,” was also co-authored with Misovich.  It appeared in the “Fuels, Petrochemicals, and Energy II” category.

    Ritter’s presentation, “Sediment Fingerprinting in the Lake Macatawa Watershed,” was co-authored with Daniel Callam, a 2009 Hope graduate who is with the Outdoor Discovery Center/Macatawa Greenway, and Dr. Graham F. Peaslee, who is the Elmer E. Hartgerink Professor of Chemistry and Environmental Science.  It appeared in the “Environmental Science and Engineering II” category.

    Steffens’s presentation, “Refinement of a Bench-Scale Corn-to-Ethanol Process Suitable for Introductory Laboratories,” was co-authored with Dr. John J. Krupczak Jr., professor of engineering.  It also appeared in the combined category of “General Engineering and Engineering Education.”

    The abstracts for the presentations are searchable by entering “Hope College Holland” as a search phrase at https://aiche.confex.com/aiche/2012/webprogramadapt/start.html .

    AIChE is the world’s leading organization for chemical engineering professionals, with more than 40,000 members from more than 90 countries.  http://www.aiche.org/about/

    Information on the AIChE annual meeting is available at: http://www.aiche.org/Conferences/AnnualMeeting/index.aspx