_WHTC_WYVN Hope College Anchored in Hope - Blog

  • Michael Bellar and the AS-IS Ensemble to Perform on Saturday, Jan. 26

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College will feature Michael Bellar and the AS-IS Ensemble on Saturday, Jan. 26, at 2 p.m. at the Knickerbocker Theatre in downtown Holland.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    Michael Bellar has performed music on six continents, but being a native of North Carolina, he stands by his slow, Southern roots. Along with creating music and touring with his group, the AS-IS Ensemble, Bellar has also toured and or recorded with Amos Lee, Art Garfunkel, Howie Day, Wheatus, Jump Little Children, Teddy Geiger, Euro pop superstar Giorgia and Jay Clifford’s Rosebud. His national TV appearances include “Late Night with David Letterman,” the “Late Show with Conan O’Brien,” the “Tonight Show” with Jay Leno, the “Ellen Degeneres Show,” “Good Morning America,” “Regis and Kelly,” and the “CBS Morning Show.” Bellar has produced and scored music for CUT Music, Fluid, Bang Music and Razorhead.

    Bellar is the founder, composer and keyboardist of the AS-IS Ensemble. This alt-jazz group has performed at such venues as Avery Fischer Hall at Lincoln Center; the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C.; South by Southwest; and the JVC, Bell Atlantic and New York City Winter Jazz Festivals; along with being the former house band at the world-famous Blue Note jazz club in New York City. The group has opened for John Scofield, Tea Leaf Green, Medeski Martin & Wood, Grant Green Jr. and JFJO.  The group has recorded three studio CDs:  “Turned On Turned Up,” “Like It Is” and “REACT!”

    In a review of the ensemble’s first performance in New York City, “Billboard Magazine” hailed the group as “Generation Next.”  The “Charleston Post and Courier” praised Bellar and the ensemble for perfecting their own brand of jazz.

    In addition to presenting the 2 p.m. concert, the group will perform with the Peter Kyle Dance Company on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 25 and 26, at 8 p.m. at the Knickerbocker Theatre. Tickets are required for the two evening dance concerts, and can be purchased online at tickets.hope.edu/ticketingor at the ticket office at the DeVos Fieldhouse by calling (616) 395-7890.

    The Knickerbocker Theatre is located at 86 E. Eighth St.

  • Civil Rights Celebration Events Run Jan. 21-26

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – A variety of activities have been scheduled at Hope College on Monday-Saturday, Jan. 21-26, in conjunction with the college’s annual Civil Rights Celebration Week.

    The week honors all persons and groups who have worked toward the advancement of civil rights and social justice, and has been organized in conjunction with the national commemoration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, Jan. 21.  Events will include screenings of the film “The Great Debaters,” the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Social Justice Luncheon, a special Chapel service and the Civil Rights Commemorative March.

    The public is invited.  Admission to all of the events except for the film is free, although advance registration is required for the luncheon.

    The week will open with the college’s Chapel service on Monday Jan. 21, at 10:30 a.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel with special guest Rev. Robert Stevenson. Stevenson is the senior pastor of City Hope Ministries in Grand Rapids and also serves as an adjunct professor at Grand Valley State University as well as Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, where he teaches courses in African American studies and African American church history. Built around 1 Cor. 12:12-28, his message will focus on activism as an issue of body unity, noting that throughout the history of social change there has always been a collective movement that crosses ethnicity, culture and race.

    The Civil Rights Commemorative March will take place immediately following the Chapel service on Monday, Jan. 21, from approximately 11 a.m. until 11:15 a.m.  The silent march, which will begin at the anchor by Graves Hall and end on the first floor of the rotunda of the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication, provides an opportunity to commemorate the sacrifices and contributions that people of all backgrounds have made for freedom and equality. The march is co-sponsored by the college’s Office of Multicultural Education and multicultural student organizations.

    Following the march, there will be a brief presentation honoring past and present social justice activist and movements on Monday, Jan. 21, at 11:15 a.m. on the first floor of the rotunda in the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication.  The event will feature remarks by Stevenson as well as poster displays, and is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Education and Campus Ministries.

    The annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Luncheon will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 11:30 a.m. in the Maas Center auditorium.  Dr. John Lee, who is a licensed psychologist and coordinator of the Multi-Ethnic Counseling Center Alliance (MECCA) at Michigan State University, will present the keynote address, “What is This Dream All About.”  Lee will provide a deep analysis of King’s dream, particularly as it relates to race, culture, and character. The luncheon is sponsored by the college’s Office of Multicultural Education and Herman Miller Inc.  Advance registration for the luncheon is taking place until Friday, Jan. 11 for community members and Hope faculty and staff. Hope students have until Thursday, Jan. 17, to RSVP.  Registration is through the Office of Multicultural Education, which can be called at (616) 395-7867or e-mailed at ome@hope.edu.

    The Social Activities Committee (SAC) will present “The Great Debaters” on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 25 and 26, at 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. in room 102 of VanderWerf Hall.  The film is a drama based on the true story of Melvin B. Tolson, a professor at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas. In 1935, he inspired students to form the school’s first debate team, which went on to challenge Harvard in the national championship.  Admission is $2, payable at the door.

    Dimnent Memorial Chapel is located at 277 College Ave., on College Avenue at 12th Street. The anchor in front of Graves Hall faces College Avenue between 10th and 12th streets.  The Maas Center is located at 264 Columbia Ave., on Columbia Avenue at 11th Street.  The Martha Miller Center for Global Communication is located at 257 Columbia Ave., on Columbia Avenue at 10th Street. VanderWerf Hall is located at 27 Graves Place, between 10th Street and Graves Place (11th Street) and Central and College avenues.

  • Winter Happening Featuring Seminars Will Be Saturday, Feb. 2

    Posted by Dan Cash

     

    HOLLAND – Perspective on youth sports, treatment for phantom limb pain, Hope’s early emphasis on globalization, conflict and resolution in the Reformed Church in America, how new chemical reactions are developed and the path of democracy in 19th-century London will all be featured during the annual Hope College Winter Happening on Saturday, Feb. 2.

     

    Winter Happening will feature multiple seminars in two blocks in the morning, a luncheon with musical entertainment and a home men’s basketball game with Albion College. Open to the general public, the event is sponsored by the college’s office of public and community relations.

     

    Admission to the seminars is free.  There is an admission charge for the luncheon and the basketball game.

     

    The morning will feature six seminars, three at 9:30 a.m. and three at 11 a.m.

     

    The 9:30 a.m. seminars are “Making Youth Sports Safer for the Mind, Body, and Spirit,” “Celebrating Hope College’s Early Graduates” and “Preparation, Hard Work, and Luck:  A Guide to the Development of a New Chemical Reaction.”  The 11 a.m. seminars are “A Good Fight: Loyalty and Conflict in the RCA,” “Electrical Stimulation as a Treatment Option for Phantom Limb Pain” and “Making Democracy: Lessons from 19th Century London.”

     

    “Making Youth Sports Safer for the Mind, Body, and Spirit” will explore the current status of youth sports, focusing on early athletic specialization, sports injury and the role of parents.  The seminar will be presented by Dr. Kirk Brumels, who is director of the college’s athletic training program, an associate professor of kinesiology and athletic trainer; and by Dr. Scott Vander Stoep, who is dean for the social sciences and a professor of psychology.

     

    “Celebrating Hope College’s Early Graduates” will examine how Hope’s emphasis on diversity, inclusion and global education are reflected in the stories of alumni of the latter 19th and early 20thcenturies, including the first graduates from abroad, two members of the Class of 1879 who were from Japan.  The seminar will be presented by Alfredo Gonzales, who is associate provost and dean for international and multicultural education; Fumihito Andy Nakajima, who is an associate professor of Japanese; and John Yelding, who is an associate professor of education.

     

    “Preparation, Hard Work, and Luck:  A Guide to the Development of a New Chemical Reaction” will provide a layperson-oriented review of the techniques used to develop molecular understanding, the characteristics of a desirable reaction, and the role of hard work—and luck.  The seminar will be presented by Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, assistant professor of chemistry and Towsley Research Scholar.

     

    “A Good Fight: Loyalty and Conflict in the RCA” will provide a brief history of the Reformed Church in America, which is the college’s parent denomination, from 1945 to 1994, with a focus on conflict and attempts at resolution.  The seminar will be presented by Dr. Lynn Japinga, professor of religion.

     

    “Electrical Stimulation as a Treatment Option for Phantom Limb Pain” will review the results of research at Hope that seeks to reduce or eliminate pain that seems to be coming from limbs that have been amputated.  The seminar will be presented by Dr. Katie Polasek, assistant professor of engineering.

     

    “Making Democracy: Lessons from 19th Century London” will explore how between 1780 and 1890 Westminster, which had been London’s most radical and contentious election district, became its most conservative and tranquil.  The seminar will be presented by Dr. Marc Baer, professor of history and chairperson of the department.

     

    The luncheon begins at 12:30 p.m. at the Haworth Inn and Conference Center ballroom, and costs $12 per person. Highlights will include a performance by Hope music students.

     

    The men’s basketball team will host Albion College at 3 p.m. at the DeVos Fieldhouse. Tickets are $6, and a limited number of general admission tickets will be available for persons attending other Winter Happening events.

     

    Also during the weekend, the gallery of the De Pree Art Center will be featuring the exhibition “PROOF:  An Exhibition of Printmaking.”  The exhibition is running from Friday, Jan. 11, through Friday, Feb. 8, and the regular gallery hours are Mondays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.; and Sundays from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. Admission is free.

     

    In addition to being required for the luncheon, advance registration is recommended for the seminars. Additional information may be obtained by calling the college’s office of public and community relations at (616) 395-7860 or online at hope.edu/pr/13WinterHappening.html

     

    Registration during the morning of the event will be from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Haworth Inn and Conference Center, located facing College Avenue between Ninth and 10th streets.


  • Guest Artists Anne Jennifer Nash and Christopher Turbessi to Perform

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Soprano Anne Jennifer Nash and pianist Christopher Turbessi will perform at Hope College on Sunday, Jan. 13, at 3 p.m. in Wichers Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music.

    The public is invited.  Admission is free.

    Christopher Turbessi, who is a 2008 Hope graduate, is currently an Emerging Artist at Virginia Opera in Norfolk, Va., where upcoming projects include Andre Previn’s “A Streetcar Named Desire,” “Le Nozze di Figaro,” and an educational outreach production of “Hansel and Gretel.”  During the summer of 2012, he was a Fellowship Pianist at the Aspen Opera Theater Center, where he coached and played in the onstage band for John Harbison’s “The Great Gatsby.”

    He has served as Principal Coach at Syracuse Opera, coaching “Madama Butterfly,” “Carmina Burana,” “La Traviata,”  “Les Pêcheurs de Perles,” “Don Giovanni” and “The Mikado.”  He was Chorus Master for “Les Pêcheurs de Perles” and “Madama Butterfly,” and prepared and traveled with Resident Artist education and scene programs.  From 2008 to 2010, as a graduate student assistant at the University of Michigan, he coached the university’s production of Christoph Willibald Glück’s “Armide,” and was on staff for two study-abroad vocal programs in Italy.  He has also accompanied for Toledo Opera’s production of “Falstaff” and Songfest in Malibu, Calif.

    Turbessi holds a Master of Music degree in collaborative piano from the University of Michigan, where he studied with Martin Katz.  He studied with Charles Aschbrenner at Hope, from which he holds a Bachelor of Music degree in piano performance.

    Anne Jennifer Nash, who is an assistant professor of voice at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., is heralded as an exceptional light-lyric soprano with an uncommon beauty of expression and musicianship.  Praising her performance as Laurie in Bard Summer Scape’s production of “The Tender Land” by Aaron Copland, Anthony Tommasini, writing for “The New York Times,” reported “The ardent soprano Anne Jennifer Nash vividly captures Laurie’s sensual yearnings.”

    Nash was in residence at “SongFest” at Pepperdine University in June 2011 as the “Distinguished Alumna,” presenting a recital of living American composers as well as a week-long collaboration with American composer Libby Larsen, culminating in the premiere of Larsen’s “Donal Oge.” She is equally at home on the opera stage, where her recent engagements include appearances in productions of the “Rake’s Progress” as Anne Trulove, “L’Elisird’amore” as Adina and “Armide” as Armide. She is the recipient of fellowships for advanced studies from “SongFest” at Pepperdine, Middlebury College, AIMS, Centro StudiItaliani (where she sang Yvette in “La Rondine”), Lake George Opera, and Chautauqua Opera, and a three-summer fellowship with the Aspen Music Festival (for which she performed Mirium in the U.S. premiere of “The Golem”).

    Nash completed her Doctorate of Musical Arts at the University of Michigan. She holds a Master of Music degree with a major in voice from the Peabody Conservatory of Music as well as a Graduate Performance Diploma in Opera, and a Bachelor of Arts in Music and French literature from Dickinson College.

    Nykerk Hall of Music is located in the central Hope campus at the former 127 E. 12th Street between College and Columbia avenues.

  • John Mark McMillan to Perform on Saturday, Jan. 12

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Hope College Veritas Forum and Hope College Concert Series will present John Mark McMillan on Saturday, Jan. 12, at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.

    McMillan’s most popular song, “How He Loves,” was released independently in 2005 and has been covered by Christian artists like David Crowder, Jesus Culture, The Glorious Unseen, Hillsong and Kari Jobe.  A native of North Carolina, he is currently touring to support his most recent recording, “Economy,” which is a natural progression and departure from the themes of death and resurrection that clothed his 2008 release, “The Medicine,” as evidenced by the opening line of “Economy’s” title track:  “Raise your voice/Chase away the ghosts.”

    Before McMillan and his band take the stage, the evening will be opened with “8 Minutes Max” performances. “8 Minutes Max” features short performances of music, dance and poetry from Hope College students. The segment offers the chance to see the creativity of various students, some of who are collaborating for the first time or performing brand new material.

    The doors will open at 7:30 p.m., and “8 Minutes Max” will begin at 8 p.m.

    Tickets for the concert are $15 for the general public and $5 with a Hope ID, and are available at https://tickets.hope.edu/ticketing and at the ticket office in the main lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse.  The ticket office is open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and can be called at (616) 395-7890.

    Also as part of the Veritas Forum, McMillan will take part in a conversation titled “Beauty and Brokenness: The Witness of Art” on Saturday, Jan. 12, at 11 a.m. alongside Susanna Childress and Wade Gugino in Winants Auditorium in Graves Hall.  Admission to the 11 a.m. presentation is free.  Additional information about the college’s Veritas Forum, which will feature multiple presentations on Thursday-Sunday, Jan. 10-13, in exploring the theme “Courage and Crisis: Embracing a Costly Discipleship,” is available at veritas.org.

    The DeVos Fieldhouse is located at 222 Fairbanks Avenue, between Ninth and 11th streets. Dimnent Chapel is located at 277 College Ave, Holland, MI.

  • GPS to Feature Suspicious Cheese Lords Early Music Vocal Ensemble

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Hope College Great Performance Series will present the Suspicious Cheese Lords on Friday, Jan. 18, at 7:30 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.

    The Suspicious Cheese Lords is an all-male a capella ensemble focusing on the music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

    The “Washington Post” has praised hearing the group as “A mind expanding experience.”

    The ensemble, based in Washington, D.C., seeks to broaden the global repertoire and listenership of choral music by unearthing forgotten works, breathing new life into familiar pieces, and supporting emerging composers. Specializing in early music, the unique brotherhood’s concerts, liturgies, recordings and educational programs provide a scholarly yet accessible interpretation of music of all eras, inspiring fans and future musicians alike.

    Joseph McLellan of the “Washington Post” said, “The Cheese Lords… sang with an ensemble precision and a sensitivity to the music’s varied styles as impressive as their imagination in programming.”

    Hope College alumnus Dan Ebeling, who graduated from the college in 2004 with a major in vocal music education, has been performing with the group since 2004 and will be singing as a countertenor at the performance.

    The group’s name shows the members’ sense of humor, yet they take their music seriously. The Suspicious Cheese Lords’ name is derived from the title of a Thomas Tallis motet, Suscipe quæso Domine. While “translating” the title, it was observed that Suscipe could be “suspicious,” quæso is close to the Spanish word queso meaning “cheese,” and Domine is “Lord.” Hence, the title of the motet was clearly “Suspicious Cheese Lord”—which in time became adopted as the group’s name. Although the name is humorous, the group appreciates the literal translation of Suscipe quæso Domine, which is, “Take, I ask, Lord.”

    The name has also caused some trouble for them as they were renamed a “Sacred Music Ensemble” when they performed at a papal mass for Pope Benedict XVI in 2008.

    From 1998 to 2006, the Cheese Lords served as the choir-in-residence for major services at the Franciscan Monastery in Washington, D.C. Additional services credits include the Cathedral of St. Matthew, Church of the Epiphany (G Street), the Church of the Holy Redeemer (Kensington, Md.) and Georgetown University’s Dahlgren Chapel.

    Individual tickets are $18 for regular admission, $13 for senior citizens, and $6 for children 18 and under. Individual and season tickets are available at the ticket office in the main lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse, which is open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and can be called at (616) 395-7890. Tickets are also available online at tickets.hope.edu/ticketing/

    The DeVos Fieldhouse is located at 222 Fairbanks Ave., between Ninth and 11th streets. Dimnent Memorial Chapel is located at 277 College Ave., on College Avenue at 12th Street.

  • Lecture on Islam and Muslim Americans Opens Exhibition at Library

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – David A. Serio, who is an educator with the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, will present the address “Islam and Muslim Americans: An Introduction to Understanding Islam” on Monday, Jan. 21, at 4 p.m. in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall at Hope College.

    The address is scheduled in conjunction with the opening of a traveling exhibition on Arab Americans and religion that will be featured on the main floor of the Van Wylen Library through Monday, Feb. 11.

    The public is invited to both the lecture and the exhibition.  Admission is free.

    The lecture will focus on topics including practices of Islam, what is meant by Islam, an explanation of the Quran, the five pillars of Islam, sacred cities, holidays and demographics of Muslim Americans.  The interactive presentation will include an opportunity for questions from the audience.

    Organized by the Arab American National Museum, the traveling exhibition includes information on the three major monotheistic religions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) and the different holidays celebrated in those religions.

    Graves Hall is located at 263 College Ave., between 10th and 12th streets.  The Vany Wylen Library is located at 53 Graves Place (11th Street), between 10th and 12th streets on College Avenue.  During the exhibition, the library will be open Mondays through Thursdays from 8 a.m. to midnight, Fridays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays from noon to midnight.

  • Hope Presents Awards to Faculty

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College presented awards honoring teaching, service and scholarship to multiple faculty members during the college’s annual recognition luncheon on Monday, Jan. 7.

    Named a “Towsley Research Scholar” was Beth Anderson, assistant professor of chemistry.

    The “Janet L. Andersen Excellence in Teaching Award” was presented to Mike Seymour, professor of chemistry, who has been a member of the faculty since 1978.

    The “Ruth and John Reed Faculty Achievement Awards” were presented to Susan Dunn, associate professor of nursing and chairperson of the department, who has taught at Hope since 1997, and Fred Johnson, associate professor of history, who has taught at Hope since 2000.

    The “Academic Computing Advisory Team (ACAT) Innovation Award” was presented to Will Polik, who is the Edward and Elizabeth Hofma Professor of Chemistry and chairperson of the department, and has been a member of the faculty since 1988.

    The “Provost’s Award for Service to the Academic Program” was presented to Peter Schakel, who is the Peter C. and Emajean Cook Professor of English and chairperson of the department, and has taught at Hope since 1969.

    The Motoichiro Oghimi Global Courage Award was presented to Alfredo Gonzales, who is associate provost and dean for international and multicultural education, and has been at Hope since 1979, and Chuck Green, who is a professor of psychology and director of the Phelps Scholars Program, and has been a member of the faculty since 1983.

    The Towsley Research Scholars Program is funded through an endowment made possible through a grant from the Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation of Midland. Through the program, newer Hope faculty members receive support for a project for four years. The foundation’s awards to the college have also included grants for the construction of the Van Wylen Library and the Schaap Science Center, faculty development in the pre-medical sciences and support for an endowed chair in communication.

    The Janet L. Andersen Excellence in Teaching Awards are presented to faculty members who have been teaching at Hope for at least seven years and who have demonstrated recognizable excellence in specific activities or aspects of teaching. The award is named in memory of Dr. Janet Andersen, a professor of mathematics at Hope who died of injuries sustained in an automobile accident on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2005.

    The Ruth and John Reed Faculty Achievement Awards recognize members of the Hope faculty who are superior teachers and have also contributed significantly in some other area of professional life. The award was established in memory of Dr. Ruth Yzenbaard Reed, a 1965 Hope graduate who was associate dean of Macomb Community College. Reed died in August 1999 at age 55.

    The Academic Computing Advisory Team (ACAT) Innovation Award is presented to a faculty or staff member who exemplifies innovation and ingenuity in the application of technology to the academic program.  The innovation may have been used in the classroom or out, in teaching or in research, or in any form of academic support or performance.

    The Provost’s Award for Service to the Academic Program is presented to individuals who have provided special contributions to the academic program through student academic support, general education, assessment work, implementation of programs that support/enhance the curriculum, and any activity outside of formal teaching that contributes to the overall excellence of the academic program.

    The Motoichiro Oghimi Global Courage Award is presented to individuals who exhibit the intercultural courage exemplified by Motoichiro Oghimi, a member of the college’s Class of 1879 who came from Japan as one of Hope’s first international students.  It is given to faculty or academic staff members who exemplify deep engagement with the part of the college’s mission that calls for preparing students for leadership and service in a global society; bold risk-taking in creating new ways and opportunities to help students engage with other people, places and cultures; and engagement in global initiatives that go above and beyond their normal responsibilities.

  • Annual Luncheon Honors Faculty

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Hope College honored faculty members for service, academic achievement and professional involvement during the college’s annual recognition luncheon on Monday, Jan. 7.

    The luncheon traditionally marks the beginning of the college’s second semester. Participating were James Bultman, president; Richard Ray, provost, and professor of kinesiology; Moses Lee, dean for the natural and applied sciences, and professor of chemistry; William Reynolds, dean for the arts and humanities, and professor of English; and Carol Simon, associate dean for teaching and learning, and professor of philosophy.

    Honored for 45 years of service was John Tammi (theatre).  Recognized for 35 years of service were Al Bell (history), Billy Mayer (art), John Patnott (kinesiology), Mike Seymour (chemistry) and Kathleen Verduin (English).  Honored for 30 years of service were Marc Baer (history), Barry Bandstra (religion), Peter Gonthier (physics), Linda Graham (dance), Chuck Green (psychology/Phelps Scholars Program), Bill Moreau (English) and Roger Nemeth (sociology).  Recognized for 25 years of service were Dawn DeWitt-Brinks (communication), Kelly Jacobsma (Van Wylen Library), Mark Northuis (kinesiology), Will Polik (chemistry), Dianne Portfleet (English), Carol Simon (philosophy, and associate dean for teaching and learning), Gloria Slaughter (Van Wylen Library), Todd Steen (economics), Joanne Stewart (chemistry), Linda Strouf (music) and Deborah Sturtevant (sociology and social work).  Honored for 20 years of service were Brian Coyle (music), Andrew Dell’Olio (philosophy), Stu Fritz (kinesiology), Lorna Hernandez Jarvis (psychology) and Cathy Mader (physics).  Recognized for 20 years of service as adjunct or part-time faculty members were Steve Gorno (kinesiology) and Pam Maat (education).  In addition, the college made special presentation to President James Bultman, who will be retiring at the end of the school year after 14 years as president and a total of 31 years at Hope between 1968 and 2013.

    Named a “Towsley Research Scholar” was Beth Anderson (chemistry).  The “Janet L. Andersen Excellence in Teaching Award” was presented to Mike Seymour (chemistry).  The “Ruth and John Reed Faculty Achievement Awards” were presented to Susan Dunn (nursing) and Fred Johnson (history). The “Academic Computing Advisory Team (ACAT) Innovation Award” was presented to Will Polik (chemistry). The “Provost’s Awards for Service to the Academic Program” was presented to Peter Schakel (English).  The “Motoichiro Oghimi Global Courage Awards” were presented to Alfredo Gonzales (associate provost and dean for international and multicultural education) and Chuck Green (psychology and director of the Phelps Scholars Program).

    Acknowledged as authors and editors during the past year were: Claudine André (Spanish), Marc Baer (history), Wayne Brouwer (religion), Rhoda Janzen Burton (English), Natalie Dykstra (English), Renata Fernandez (Spanish), Lee Forester (German), Jim Herrick (communication), David Myers (psychology), Laura Pardo (education), Jack Ridl (English, emeritus), Peter Schakel (English), Heather Sellers (English), Carol Simon (philosophy, and associate dean for teaching and learning), Steve Taylor (chemistry, emeritus), Kent VanTil (religion) and Daniel Woolsey (Spanish).

    Honored for accomplishment as performing artists were: Adam Clark (music), Mihai Craioveanu (music), Steven Iannacone and dANCEpROjECt (dance), Huw Lewis (music), Daina Robins (theatre) and Steve Talaga (music).  Recognized for her work as an artist was Katherine Sullivan (art). Members of the kinesiology faculty and staff honored for accomplishments as coaches were: Kevin Cole (men’s and women’s track and field), Brian Morehouse (women’s basketball), Matt Neil (men’s basketball), Mark Northuis (women’s cross country) and Nate Price (women’s tennis).

    Faculty honored for being named officers of professional associations were:  Michelle Bombe (theatre), David Cunningham (CrossRoads Project, and Center for Writing and Research), Lee Forester (German), Christina Hornbach (music) and Julie Sooy (music).

    Faculty and other members of the campus community recognized for receiving honors and awards were: Elisabeth Bauman (English), Virginia Beard (political science), Kristin Brace (English), Carrie Bredow (psychology), James Bultman (president), Susanna Childress (English), Ernest Cole (English), Paul DeYoung (physics), Robert Fortner (communication), Donna Garrett (nursing), Choonghee Han (communication), Teresa Housel (communication), Stacey Johnson (Spanish), Corissa Lamphear (chemistry), Tom Ludwig (psychology), David Myers (psychology), Jared Ortiz (religion), Bill Pannapacker (English), David Phillips (economics, management and accounting), Jack Ridl (English, emeritus), Carol Simon (philosophy, and associate dean for teaching and learning), Scott VanderStoep (psychology, and dean for the social sciences), Steve VanderVeen (management, and Center for Faithful Leadership), Courtney Werner (English) and Angie Yetzke (dance).  In addition, the department of education was honored for earning a 70, the highest possible score, on the Michigan Department of Education Teacher Preparation Institution Performance Scores Report, and the department of nursing was recognized for receiving a “Building Michigan’s Health Care Workforce Award” from the Michigan Health Council.

    Several faculty and staff were recognized as recipients of grants and fellowships:  Claudine André (Spanish), Airat Bekmetjev (mathematics), Aaron Best (biology), Brian Bodenbender (geological and environmental sciences), Anna Bonnema (FACES program), Ken Brown (chemistry), Tom Bultman (biology), Liz Colburn (Upward Bound), Matt DeJongh (computer science), Herb Dershem (computer science, and institutional research), Carrie Dummer (education), Sue Dunn (nursing), Natalie Dykstra (English), Stephanie Edwards (mathematics), Janis Gibbs (history), Peter Gonthier (physics), Virgil Gulker (Center for Faithful Leadership), Jonathan Hagood (history), Maria Hledin (biology and chemistry), Lynn Japinga (religion), Mike Jipping (computer science), Jeff Johnson (chemistry), Julie Kipp (English), Jacquelin Koch (geological and environmental sciences, and chemistry), Brent Krueger (chemistry), Jianhua Li (biology), Cathy Mader (physics), Tracy McMichael (Center for Faithful Leadership), Greg Murray (biology), Karen Nordell Pearson (chemistry, and associate dean for research and scholarship), Graham Peaslee (chemistry, and geological and environmental sciences), Jeanne Petit (history), Julia Randel (music), Steve Remillard (physics), Daina Robins (theatre), Heather Sellers (English), Christian Spielvogel (communication), Joanne Stewart (chemistry), Deb Sturtevant (sociology and social work), Katherine Sullivan (art), Todd Swanson (mathematics), Sonja Trent-Brown (psychology), Jill VanderStoep (mathematics), Roger Veldman (engineering) and Brian Yurk (mathematics).

  • Knickerbocker Theatre Announces Winter Film Series

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The Hope College Knickerbocker Theatre in downtown Holland will continue its tradition of showing contemporary and independent films through its 2013 winter film series beginning Monday, Jan. 7.

    The series will feature three films in January and February, and one in April.  The series includes “Robot and Frank” (Jan. 7-12), “Searching for Sugar Man” (Jan. 14-19), “Hitchcock” (Jan. 28-Feb. 2) and “Amour” (April 1-6).  All films are rated PG-13 and will be shown at 7:30 p.m.

    “Robot and Frank,” running Monday-Saturday, Jan. 7-12, is about Frank, a retired cat burglar, with two grown kids who are concerned that he can no longer live alone. They are tempted to place him in a nursing home until Frank’s son chooses a different option: against the old man’s wishes, he buys Frank a walking, talking humanoid robot programmed to improve his physical and mental health. What follows is an often hilarious and heartwarming story about finding friends and family in the most unexpected places. “Robot and Frank” features an award-winning cast including Academy Award-nominee Frank Langella, James Marsden, Liv Tyler and Academy Award-winner Susan Sarandon.

    “Searching for Sugar Man,” running Monday-Saturday, Jan. 14-19, is an award-winning documentary about two South African men seeking to find out what happened to Rodriguez, an American musician rumored to have committed suicide on stage. His only recording, “Cold Fact,” was critically acclaimed, but a commercial flop in the 1960s and the artist slowly faded out of sight. However, a bootleg recording of the album appeared in South Africa in the early 1970s and developed a large cult following and became a voice for the white resistance movement in the country. The government banned the recording, which only ensured its growing fame. Now, decades later, two of those fans seek to find out what is behind the myth, and result is completely unexpected. “Searching for Sugar Man” won the Special Jury Prize and the Audience Award for best international documentary at the Sundance Film Festival. The film also won the Audience Award at the Los Angeles Film Festival.

    “Hitchcock,” running Monday-Saturday, Jan. 28-Feb. 2, is a drama about legendary director Alfred Hitchcock, and his wife, Alma, during the filming of Hitchcock’s masterpiece, “Psycho.” Forced to self-finance the film, Hitchcock’s creative wife tires of the strain and his roving eye when it comes to actresses, creating tension in the marriage. The story behind one of the greatest films of all times is nearly as fascinating as the film itself. Featuring two Academy Award-winners in the main roles, Anthony Hopkins and Helen Mirren, the film is winning critical praise.

    “Amour,” running Monday-Saturday, April 1-6, has a simple premise. Georges and Anne, who are in their eighties, are cultivated, retired music teachers whose daughter, who is also a musician, lives abroad with her family. One day, Anne has an attack and the couple’s bond of love is severely tested. The Michael Haneke film teams up two of the leading French actors, Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva, along with Isabelle Huppert. This film was given the prestigious Palme d’Or for best film at the Cannes Film Festival. “The New York Times,” “Los Angeles Times,” “Time Magazine” and several other outlets have named it the top picture of the year. The film is in French with English subtitles.

    Tickets for all of the films are $6 for regular admission and $5 for senior citizens, Hope College faculty, and children. Updated information may be obtained by visiting hope.edu/arts/knick.

    The Knickerbocker Theatre is located at 86 E. Eighth St.

  • Paul DeYoung Elected Fellow of American Physical Society

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – Dr. Paul DeYoung of the Hope College physics faculty has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

    He is one of 250 Fellows elected for 2012, and one of only four nominated through the society’s Forum on Education, chosen “For his strong and sustained leadership of facilitating research opportunities to enhance undergraduate education.”  This year’s Fellows are from around the world and work in higher education, major research laboratories and industry.

    The recognition is a second major national honor to DeYoung from the society, which in 2001 presented him with its “Prize to a Faculty Member for Research in an Undergraduate Institution.”

    “Professor DeYoung is an esteemed colleague and an outstanding teacher-scholar, and we are proud of his accomplishments,” said Dr. Moses Lee, who is dean for the natural and applied sciences at Hope.  “Being elected an APS Fellow is a major recognition of his decades-long contribution to cutting-edge physics research while enhancing undergraduate physics and science education through research.”

    “This recognition is a direct reflection of the Natural and Applied Sciences Division’s Vision 20/20 strategic plan, and that is to raise the academic excellence to a higher and uncharted level,” Lee said.  “I am thankful to the physics community for highlighting the importance of undergraduate research and its centrality to effective teaching in physics.”

    DeYoung, who is the Kenneth G. Herrick Professor of Physics at Hope, noted that he’s grateful to have been recognized by his peers for doing well something that he loves doing:  teaching students—at Hope and elsewhere—about physics through involvement in original research.

    “It’s been great fun to do this,” said DeYoung, who has been a member of the Hope faculty since 1985 and conducts research in nuclear physics.  “I think I would do this no matter what, but it is nice that you can come in every day and you do what you do, and then recognition comes along as a result of that.”

    He co-leads the college’s “nuclear group,” through which students and faculty conduct research collaboratively in nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry, with Dr. Graham Peaslee, who is the Elmer E. Hartgerink Professor of Chemistry and professor of geology/environmental science at Hope.  In addition to working with Hope students, they have connected with undergraduate students from several other institutions through the college’s participation in a multi-school consortium collaborating to build and use a pair of neutron detectors, dubbed “MoNA-LISA,” housed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University.

    DeYoung joined the faculty as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 1991 and to professor in 1997, and was appointed to the Kenneth G. Herrick professorship in 2005. Among other service to Hope, he was chairperson of the department of physics from 1995 to 2004.

    In February 2011, the college’s division for the natural and applied sciences recognized him and Peaslee for their work with that year’s “James N. Boelkins Natural and Applied Sciences Division Research Award.”

    More than 60 Hope students have worked with DeYoung on research projects over the years. They have gone on to careers in a variety of scientific areas. Former students are now researchers, college and university teachers, doctors, engineers and high school teachers, and several are employed at high-tech companies.

    His research has received continuous support, totaling more than $2 million, since 1985 from agencies including the National Science Foundation, Research Corporation and the Michigan Space Grant Consortium. His work has resulted in more than 80 journal articles and more than 80 presentations at professional conferences.

    He graduated from Hope summa cum laude in 1977. He completed his doctorate at the University of Notre Dame in 1982, and subsequently conducted research at the Nuclear Structure Laboratory, SUNY-Stony Brook, before returning to Hope to teach.

    The American Physical Society is a non-profit membership organization working to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics through its outstanding research journals, scientific meetings, and education, outreach, advocacy and international activities.  Founded in 1899, APA represents more than 50,000 members, including physicists in academia, national laboratories and industry in the United States and throughout the world.

  • Veritas Forum Will Run Jan. 10-13

    Posted by Dan Cash

    HOLLAND – The role of faith in bolstering courage in time of crisis will be the focus of the ninth biennial Veritas Forum at Hope College, which will take place on Thursday-Sunday, Jan. 10-13.

    Featuring a variety of presentations, including two keynote addresses, three panel discussions and a concert, the forum will examine the topic “Courage and Crisis: Embracing a Costly Discipleship.”

    Although the Veritas Forum has been planned for the campus community, the public is invited.  Admission is free to all events except for the concert.

    The mission overview for this year’s forum provides a framework for the discussion by asking, “How does Christ call us to respond to crises, whether encountered in international settings or in the intimate arena of our own emotions?  What kind of preparation is necessary to respond with courage that does not yield in the face of a crisis?”

    The overview continues, “Christian discipleship shapes our responses to ordinary events, but also how we live, think and speak in extraordinarily difficult circumstances.  Following Jesus may mean pronouncing the gospel of grace in a hostile environment, insisting on justice when injustice holds sway, or simply standing by a friend under assault.”

    The forum will open on Thursday, Jan. 10, at 7 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel with the keynote address “Who is Christ for us Today? The Fierce Urgency of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Final Questions” by Dr. Charles Marsh, who is professor of religious studies and director of The Project on Lived Theology at the University of Virginia.

    The Rev. Canon Dr. Andrew White, who is chaplain of St. George’s Anglican Church in Baghdad, Iraq, will speak during the college’s chapel service on Friday, Jan. 11, at 10:30 a.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel, discussing “Faith Under Fire.”

    A panel discussion on Friday, Jan. 11, at 3 p.m. in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall will reflect on “Courage, the Cross and Our Community.”  Chaired by Dr. James Herrick, who is the Guy Vander Jagt Professor of Communication at Hope, the panel will feature Marshall Booker, a retired social worker who is a deacon at Messiah Missionary Baptist Church in Grand Rapids; Jeff Roessing, who is founder of Eighth Day Farm in Holland; Dr. Sue Rozeboom, who is assistant professor of liturgical theology at Western Theological Seminary; and Bev Schipper of Hamilton, artist and owner of Dumb Sheep Notecards.

    Canon White, who has led St. George’s since 1998, will present the Veritas Forum’s second keynote address, “Taking Risks for the Kingdom,” on Friday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.

    The activities on Saturday, Jan. 12, will open with the panel “Beauty or Brokenness: The Witness of Art” at 11 a.m. in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall.  Chaired by Elizabeth Bauman, visiting assistant professor of English at Hope, the panel will feature Dr. Susanna Childress, an adjunct assistant professor of English at Hope and award-winning writer; Wade Gugino, a cartoon artist and 1992 Hope graduate from Holland; and songwriter John Mark McMillan, who will also be performing in concert later in the day.

    A second event on Saturday, Jan. 12, will feature papers by Hope and Western Theological Seminary students on courage.  The presentations will take place at 1 p.m. in rooms 119, 201 and 204 of Graves Hall.

    John Mark McMillan, with Hope students opening, will perform on Saturday, Jan. 12, at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.  McMillan’s most popular song, “How He Loves,” was released independently in 2005 and has been covered by Christian artists like David Crowder, Jesus Culture, The Glorious Unseen, Hillsong and Kari Jobe.  He is currently touring to support his most recent recording, “Economy,” which is a natural progression and departure from the themes of death and resurrection that clothed his 2008 release, “The Medicine,” as evidenced by the opening line of “Economy’s” title track:  “Raise your voice/Chase away the ghosts.”

    The opening performances for McMillan’s concert will be offered by Hope students in an 8 Minutes Max format.  Through performances lasting at most eight minutes, a series of Hope students will apply music, dance and visual arts to exploring this year’s Veritas Forum theme.

    Advance tickets for the concert are $15 for the general public and $5 for Hope students, and are available at the ticket office in the front lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse.  The ticket office is open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and can be called at (616) 395-7890. Public tickets are also available for purchase online at https://tickets.hope.edu/ticketing.

    The Veritas Forum will conclude with the college’s weekly Sunday evening worship service, “The Gathering,” on January 13 at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.  Canon White will preach.

    The DeVos Fieldhouse is located at 222 Fairbanks Ave., between Ninth and 11th streets. Dimnent Memorial Chapel is located at 277 College Ave., on College Avenue at 12th Street.  Graves Hall is located at 263 College Ave., between 10th and 12th streets.

    The Veritas Forum began at Harvard University in 1992 as a way to get students to think about what the school was founded upon: the Veritas, or truth, of Jesus Christ. Since then, dozens of campuses in the United States and abroad have emulated the Harvard model and held forums of their own.

    The Hope Veritas Forum is designed to include the arts, ideas, theology and popular culture, so as to listen to how God works in the lives of writers, musicians, social activists, educators and artists. This forum has run every two years since its 1997 debut on campus.